Generation Moonshot

Startling insights into Alzheimer’s disease by prof. Franck Polleux

By February 9, 2019 No Comments

“My moonshot is to help understand how neurons get connected during development, how those connections are maintained throughout our lives or how these connections are lost in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease.”

Dr. Franck Polleux did his undergraduate and graduate studies at Université Claude Bernard in Lyon, (France) where he obtained his Ph.D. in Neuroscience in 1997. He then joined the laboratory of Dr. Anirvan Ghosh at Johns Hopkins University for his post-doctoral training. In 2002, Dr Polleux was hired as an Assistant Professor in the Neuroscience Center and Department of Pharmacology at the University of North Carolina- Chapel Hill where he became an Associate Professor in 2008. In August 2010, he joined The Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, California.

In November 2013, he was recruited as a Professor in the Department of Neuroscience at Columbia University to join the new Mortimer B. Zuckerman Mind, Brain, Behavior Institute.

Throughout his career, Dr. Polleux has focused on the identification of the molecular mechanisms underlying neuronal development in the mammalian brain. More recently, his lab started studying the genetic basis of human brain evolution as well as the signaling pathways underlying synaptic loss during early stages of Alzheimer’s Disease progression.

My Passion

Study and help understand the most extraordinary and complex cells in our body, neurons and how they make connections in the brain.

My Moment of Impact

The identification of a new class of proteins that tether mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that might have a clinical impact in various forms of neurodegeneration including Alzheimer’s disease. http://science.sciencemag.org/content/358/6363/623/

My Moonshot for Life

To help understand how neurons get connected during development, how those connections are maintained throughout our lives or how these connections are lost in neurodegenerative diseases such as AD.

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